noisy rearend gears - or is it??? 3.55 8-3/4"

fury fan

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I generally am giving out thoughts and ideas, but now it's my turn to ask for help.
I'm trying to diagnose some car noise, I had my conclusion made (blaming the axle gears) but I started taking things apart and now I'm unsure.

Car: 68 Plymouth Fury, lots of miles but many things have been rebuilt. Was a well-maintained/very reliable driver in past years but hasn't gotten more than 1000 miles in the last 5-7 years. (it is still very reliable, though)

It has a bit of noise that I have assumed is the rearend gears. It is a slappy-growl that happens as soon as the car starts moving, and doesn't change with load, nor accel/coasting. It's pretty linear with road speed. And it's quite noticeable.

The gears are 3.55SG I got from a buddy many years ago, he said one of teh bearings had a roller fall out but otherwise OK. (didn't notice any damage on the gears)
I took the gears to a shop to get the bearings replaced and a new seal. Was told would take about a week, 6-ish weeks later I begged them to get it done so they finally did. (a reputable shop, and I carried the gearset in, was not installed in the car)
I didn't install the gears right away, they sat for awhile (past any warranty or complaint period)
Buddy and I installed a slightly-narrower axle in my car (from a 66-67 B-body, IIRC), and I believe this is when the gears probably went in - but I don't remember. (I've had this car 25 years. Regardless, the gears sat for awhile).
The axle shaft bearings (from that used narrower axle) were surely cleaned/greased at that time, likely new inner shaft seals also (the ones in the housing).

This noise has not always been there, I don't remember when it started but was either when the narrower axle/shafts were installed, or when the gears were installed.
But I've always suspected these gears as the culprit. I pestered the shop to finish the job and I wondered if maybe they just gave it a new seal and a paintjob to make me go away? (again, my buddy said a bearing was missing a roller)

Sidebar:
I sometimes have a very squeaky brake when driving forward and hitting the brake, it goes away after 20 feet or so. If I drive the car 1/week it doesn't happen. Only if it sits for a month or longer.
Tonight I pulled the rear wheels to check the brakes and begin a gear swap.
Passenger drum came off easily, the driver's required a little nudging with a small prybar (but not unusual).
The passenger side backing plate has some wetness from the axleshaft and lower. Teh wheel cylinders have the type of boots that are very stiff, so don't want to pop off to see if a leak, but it is pretty dry south of the whl cyl.
There is a tiny bit of wetness that starts just south of the axleshaft retainer flange.
I will presume this to be the squeaky-brake culprit. (until better evidence comes along, anyway)

Driverside brake looks A1, just some mild dust on the 'new' springs installed at the last brake job.


So:
I turn the passenger axleshaft and expect to hear lots of awful noise. However - it's quieter than any axle I can remember and it felt nice.
Both axles are turning the same direction, but it's kinda easy to turn them the forward direction.
Turning them rearward is significantly more difficult (and they also turn the same direction). IS THIS NORMAL???
The driveshaft is turning during all of this. I reached under to wiggle at the rear U-joint to see if any significant wear but it seems tight. (I replaced those U-joints years ago, and would guess to have 75k on them, so are due for inspection)

I put a screwdriver-stethoscope on the axleshaft retainer plate and rotated the shaft and heard minimal noise. It maybe sounded a little dry, but at this point I'm looking for bad, so the brain will invent it if necessary.
Driverside bearing sounded quieter and almost seemed like I could hear the other bearing thru the housing also.
Regardless, I didn't find anything that would seem to cause such an immediate noticeable noise.

Next steps are:
Remove the driveshaft and re-spin the axle.
Check the U-joints (they are due!)
Then remove axle shafts and feel the bearings.

But wanted some thoughts from you guys as well.

Video of spinning the axle:
Starts out showing forward rotation, via twisting the axle flange.
18 secs - reversing direction, which is significantly harder to turn.
30 secs - putting the drum on the axle studs for more leverage.
45 sec - ill-fated attempt with bungee cord to show other axle is rotating the same direction.
58 secs - installed tire to show direction.




Pic of under the wheel cylinder:
1661921109625.png
 

1970FuryConv

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Sure grip should turn same direction both wheels. Open differential: opposite directions
My experience: 742 sure grip seems harder to turn in reverse.
My experience: worn axle shaft bearings make the most noise on turns. Going straight they are relatively quiet.
Not sure what linear slappy growl sounds like. My experience: the noise from a worn 8.75 rear increases with speed. Bad rear pinion bearing is noisiest during acceleration/deceleration.
If you still have tapered axle bearings, you could try adjusting the right side to give more play and listen to whether that changes the noise. If so, it might be your differential that's the problem.
If you know of a local company, that cares about repeat customers, you could let one of their techs test drive and listen.

In the end, I'd pull the 8.75 diff/housing and let a quality company rebuild it.
 

MONC440

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Sure grip should turn same direction both wheels. Open differential: opposite directions
My experience: 742 sure grip seems harder to turn in reverse.
My experience: worn axle shaft bearings make the most noise on turns. Going straight they are relatively quiet.
Not sure what linear slappy growl sounds like. My experience: the noise from a worn 8.75 rear increases with speed. Bad rear pinion bearing is noisiest during acceleration/deceleration.
If you still have tapered axle bearings, you could try adjusting the right side to give more play and listen to whether that changes the noise. If so, it might be your differential that's the problem.
If you know of a local company, that cares about repeat customers, you could let one of their techs test drive and listen.

In the end, I'd pull the 8.75 diff/housing and let a quality company rebuild it.
I agree with the above.

Most gear train noise and bearing noise change pitch with speed and is usually a whining. I test bearings by going to a big parking lot and drive straight, left and right and see if the noise changes, if so it is usually a bad bearing.

You could be having a trans noise, I test this by driving the speed that the noise is most noticeable and then slide the trans into neutral. If the noise doesn't change at all it is most likely between the trans output shaft bearing and axle bearings, so bearings, gears, driveshaft..... If the noise goes away it is most likely forward of the rear trans bearing someplace so trans or engine.

Years ago I had a guy with an NVH issue. When he brought it to me he had already had the rear axle rebuilt with all new bearings, gears & brakes. I put the car in gear and the noise started and changed just a bit driving went away in neutral but you could hear it slightly if you reved the engine. I crawled under the car and he had a bad exhaust isolator.

I have seen several cars with gear noise that you can't feel at all on stands and turning by hand.

NVH is one of the hardest things to diagnose. Getting a book on noise vibration & harshness (NVH) diagnosis will help.
 

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@1970FuryConv
FWIW, this is a 489 housing - what is your experience in reverse-rotating one of those?

And duh - I have a car sitting right next to it that I can jack up and rotate for comparison.

Perhaps I should put it back together and do a test drive and record the sound, and also do some turns and do a neutral coast.
 

Ripinator

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I generally am giving out thoughts and ideas, but now it's my turn to ask for help.
I'm trying to diagnose some car noise, I had my conclusion made (blaming the axle gears) but I started taking things apart and now I'm unsure.

Car: 68 Plymouth Fury, lots of miles but many things have been rebuilt. Was a well-maintained/very reliable driver in past years but hasn't gotten more than 1000 miles in the last 5-7 years. (it is still very reliable, though)

It has a bit of noise that I have assumed is the rearend gears. It is a slappy-growl that happens as soon as the car starts moving, and doesn't change with load, nor accel/coasting. It's pretty linear with road speed. And it's quite noticeable.

The gears are 3.55SG I got from a buddy many years ago, he said one of teh bearings had a roller fall out but otherwise OK. (didn't notice any damage on the gears)
I took the gears to a shop to get the bearings replaced and a new seal. Was told would take about a week, 6-ish weeks later I begged them to get it done so they finally did. (a reputable shop, and I carried the gearset in, was not installed in the car)
I didn't install the gears right away, they sat for awhile (past any warranty or complaint period)
Buddy and I installed a slightly-narrower axle in my car (from a 66-67 B-body, IIRC), and I believe this is when the gears probably went in - but I don't remember. (I've had this car 25 years. Regardless, the gears sat for awhile).
The axle shaft bearings (from that used narrower axle) were surely cleaned/greased at that time, likely new inner shaft seals also (the ones in the housing).

This noise has not always been there, I don't remember when it started but was either when the narrower axle/shafts were installed, or when the gears were installed.
But I've always suspected these gears as the culprit. I pestered the shop to finish the job and I wondered if maybe they just gave it a new seal and a paintjob to make me go away? (again, my buddy said a bearing was missing a roller)

Sidebar:
I sometimes have a very squeaky brake when driving forward and hitting the brake, it goes away after 20 feet or so. If I drive the car 1/week it doesn't happen. Only if it sits for a month or longer.
Tonight I pulled the rear wheels to check the brakes and begin a gear swap.
Passenger drum came off easily, the driver's required a little nudging with a small prybar (but not unusual).
The passenger side backing plate has some wetness from the axleshaft and lower. Teh wheel cylinders have the type of boots that are very stiff, so don't want to pop off to see if a leak, but it is pretty dry south of the whl cyl.
There is a tiny bit of wetness that starts just south of the axleshaft retainer flange.
I will presume this to be the squeaky-brake culprit. (until better evidence comes along, anyway)

Driverside brake looks A1, just some mild dust on the 'new' springs installed at the last brake job.


So:
I turn the passenger axleshaft and expect to hear lots of awful noise. However - it's quieter than any axle I can remember and it felt nice.
Both axles are turning the same direction, but it's kinda easy to turn them the forward direction.
Turning them rearward is significantly more difficult (and they also turn the same direction). IS THIS NORMAL???
The driveshaft is turning during all of this. I reached under to wiggle at the rear U-joint to see if any significant wear but it seems tight. (I replaced those U-joints years ago, and would guess to have 75k on them, so are due for inspection)

I put a screwdriver-stethoscope on the axleshaft retainer plate and rotated the shaft and heard minimal noise. It maybe sounded a little dry, but at this point I'm looking for bad, so the brain will invent it if necessary.
Driverside bearing sounded quieter and almost seemed like I could hear the other bearing thru the housing also.
Regardless, I didn't find anything that would seem to cause such an immediate noticeable noise.

Next steps are:
Remove the driveshaft and re-spin the axle.
Check the U-joints (they are due!)
Then remove axle shafts and feel the bearings.

But wanted some thoughts from you guys as well.

Video of spinning the axle:
Starts out showing forward rotation, via twisting the axle flange.
18 secs - reversing direction, which is significantly harder to turn.
30 secs - putting the drum on the axle studs for more leverage.
45 sec - ill-fated attempt with bungee cord to show other axle is rotating the same direction.
58 secs - installed tire to show direction.




Pic of under the wheel cylinder:
View attachment 555235


I am suspicious about the condition of your axle bearings. . . Also, did you check the back-lash? I think it should be .010 to .022. I recently set mine to .018.
 

fury fan

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Thanks for the input, everyone.

If you say the word 'rubber' quickly and repeatedly, that's kinda what this noise sounds like.

Did some driving around under different and intentional conditions, recorded the sound on the phone, and then tonight had a neighbor do some recording with a Go-Pro mounted in the trunk, and then underneath the car. So far the files have too much other background sounds that mask the noise I hear. There was surprisingly a LOT of exhaust noise audible inside the trunk. When he sends me the files I'll listen thru headphones, if that helps I'll post those to YT.

To address some particulars some folks have mentioned. Any specific suggestion I don't respond to down below means I haven't tried it yet.
Sure grip should turn same direction both wheels. Open differential: opposite directions
My experience: 742 sure grip seems harder to turn in reverse.
My experience: worn axle shaft bearings make the most noise on turns. Going straight they are relatively quiet.
Not sure what linear slappy growl sounds like. My experience: the noise from a worn 8.75 rear increases with speed. Bad rear pinion bearing is noisiest during acceleration/deceleration.
If you still have tapered axle bearings, you could try adjusting the right side to give more play and listen to whether that changes the noise. If so, it might be your differential that's the problem.
If you know of a local company, that cares about repeat customers, you could let one of their techs test drive and listen.

In the end, I'd pull the 8.75 diff/housing and let a quality company rebuild it.
Noise does NOT seem to increase with speed. Due to that, it's most noticeable about 15-20mph after it's gone to 2nd gear and engine rpm drops and the car overall is a little quieter. It does not seem to get any louder at 40+ mph, or the other increased noises have masked it, anyway.
Noise does not change on turns.
Noise does not change significantly during accel/decel.
I agree with the above.

Most gear train noise and bearing noise change pitch with speed and is usually a whining. I test bearings by going to a big parking lot and drive straight, left and right and see if the noise changes, if so it is usually a bad bearing.

You could be having a trans noise, I test this by driving the speed that the noise is most noticeable and then slide the trans into neutral. If the noise doesn't change at all it is most likely between the trans output shaft bearing and axle bearings, so bearings, gears, driveshaft..... If the noise goes away it is most likely forward of the rear trans bearing someplace so trans or engine.

Years ago I had a guy with an NVH issue. When he brought it to me he had already had the rear axle rebuilt with all new bearings, gears & brakes. I put the car in gear and the noise started and changed just a bit driving went away in neutral but you could hear it slightly if you reved the engine. I crawled under the car and he had a bad exhaust isolator.

I have seen several cars with gear noise that you can't feel at all on stands and turning by hand.

NVH is one of the hardest things to diagnose. Getting a book on noise vibration & harshness (NVH) diagnosis will help.
Again, no changes in noise on turns.
Put trans in neutral and made no difference.
Turning engine off and coasting (which we did to try to help the Go-Pro audio) made no difference in sound inside the car.

I am suspicious about the condition of your axle bearings. . . Also, did you check the back-lash? I think it should be .010 to .022. I recently set mine to .018.
I presume you are meanign the endplay on the passenger axleshaft? Haven't check it yet.


My next steps are:
Check axle endplay. If OOS, I'll adjust it and do a test drive.
Check both U-joints, grease them, and take another drive.
Pull the axle shafts, feel the bearings, re-grease and take another drive.
Raise the front end, remove the wheels, and feel those bearings. (but those have <5000 miles on them, installed by me, so I anticipate no findings)

After that the 3.55s come out and a known-good 3.23 goes in. I'm hoping to take this on the CATL drive on the 17th and I don't want to feed 3.55s for that trip anyway.
 

1970FuryConv

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Thanks for the input, everyone.

If you say the word 'rubber' quickly and repeatedly, that's kinda what this noise sounds like.

Did some driving around under different and intentional conditions, recorded the sound on the phone, and then tonight had a neighbor do some recording with a Go-Pro mounted in the trunk, and then underneath the car. So far the files have too much other background sounds that mask the noise I hear. There was surprisingly a LOT of exhaust noise audible inside the trunk. When he sends me the files I'll listen thru headphones, if that helps I'll post those to YT.

To address some particulars some folks have mentioned. Any specific suggestion I don't respond to down below means I haven't tried it yet.

Noise does NOT seem to increase with speed. Due to that, it's most noticeable about 15-20mph after it's gone to 2nd gear and engine rpm drops and the car overall is a little quieter. It does not seem to get any louder at 40+ mph, or the other increased noises have masked it, anyway.
Noise does not change on turns.
Noise does not change significantly during accel/decel.

Again, no changes in noise on turns.
Put trans in neutral and made no difference.
Turning engine off and coasting (which we did to try to help the Go-Pro audio) made no difference in sound inside the car.


I presume you are meanign the endplay on the passenger axleshaft? Haven't check it yet.


My next steps are:
Check axle endplay. If OOS, I'll adjust it and do a test drive.
Check both U-joints, grease them, and take another drive.
Pull the axle shafts, feel the bearings, re-grease and take another drive.
Raise the front end, remove the wheels, and feel those bearings. (but those have <5000 miles on them, installed by me, so I anticipate no findings)

After that the 3.55s come out and a known-good 3.23 goes in. I'm hoping to take this on the CATL drive on the 17th and I don't want to feed 3.55s for that trip anyway.
Will be interesting to hear if the noise goes away with the center section swap.
 

fury fan

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Checked both U-joints and they feel pretty decent. They swivel quite nicely with no notchiness, I removed 1 cap to confirm the obvious, and it had grease and looked just like it should.

Axleshaft endplay was tight at .009" on a .013-.023" spec. I would expect this to be a longterm durability thing on the 2 axle bearings, and not a noise manifest upon pulling away from a stoplight.

Corrected the endplay and did a test drive, and the noise is still there.


Discovered what seems like a lot of backlash on the input yoke.


So the gearset is coming out next, and a known-good 3.23 shall go in.
 

1970FuryConv

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Looks like 30°. I think that's too much. The shop that said one week and took 6 weeks deserves a bad Google review.
 

Ripinator

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Checked both U-joints and they feel pretty decent. They swivel quite nicely with no notchiness, I removed 1 cap to confirm the obvious, and it had grease and looked just like it should.

Axleshaft endplay was tight at .009" on a .013-.023" spec. I would expect this to be a longterm durability thing on the 2 axle bearings, and not a noise manifest upon pulling away from a stoplight.

Corrected the endplay and did a test drive, and the noise is still there.


Discovered what seems like a lot of backlash on the input yoke.


So the gearset is coming out next, and a known-good 3.23 shall go in.


I swear. . . Setting up a differential is a black art. There are so few who are able to do it correctly.
 

fury fan

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Looks like 30°. I think that's too much. The shop that said one week and took 6 weeks deserves a bad Google review.

It's kinda my undoing for getting the work done and then not installing them right away (and not knowing enough to check their work). My chance to get it corrected evaporated on the shelf.
Ironically, I think they have since gone out of business (it's been at least 10 years since they did the work) but at the time I took the gears in they had a really good reputation.

I swear. . . Setting up a differential is a black art. There are so few who are able to do it correctly.

Not having ever done it, I would agree.
But it's an iterative thing, so you can keep checking the result and keep adjusting the factors that get it there. Eventually even a beginner should get it right?
Unlike reinstalling the valve body on the PS gearbox, where each adjustment is a throw of dart.
 

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I've never done it either, but I bought enough stuff to make a 4.10 and 4.30 spool from a guy in pieces and I'm going to try this winter
 

1970FuryConv

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I once rebuilt a 727 and didn't use it for 6 years. Surprisingly, it performs excellent. Quality parts and careful work make a difference.
 

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Update:
The 3.55s don't look chewed up or anything, and no noticeable metal in the lube that drained out.
The differential bearing adjusters had massive amounts of punch-hammering marks in most of the holes. ???
1 tooth on the ring gear had a pitted area about the size of a fingernail.
So it's visually not the smoking gun I had anticipated.

The massive amount of free-play rotation when in the car is now very minimal when on the workbench.
Ironically, the known-good 3.23 I am putting in has about the same amount. Hmmm...

The axle/wheel bearings were still nicely-greased, but the driverside had some metal particles come out when I cleaned/flushed it.
So that needs repaired.
I don't think I put enough miles on it for that tight bearing endplay to have destroyed the bearing, but they were used axles, so who knows. Regardless, it's the situation I'm in.

So:
I would like some guidance on replacing the axle bearings, I need to decide whether to buy a cheap Harbor Freight press or have professionals do it.
Anyone with recent experience (like @Ripinator) please chime in!

Did you do yourself or have a repair shop do it?
If yourself, did you use a press or some other method?
If you hired it out, did you give them loose axles, or give them the whole car?
Did you use Green bearings or the original tapered-roller?
If tapered roller, did you see the need to replace the retainer plates or anything else?
 

1970FuryConv

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@fury fan
Did you do yourself or have a repair shop do it?
I had a repair shop do the left side axle bearings. The head of the shop inspected the right side axle and told me the tapered bearing and adjuster were OK. I agreed with his assessment.
If yourself, did you use a press or some other method?
I stipulated and the shop agreed that the bearings should be installed by press. Cold pressed into position. Heating an axle too much can undermine the integrity of tempered steel.
If you hired it out, did you give them loose axles, or give them the whole car?
I gave loose axles.
Did you use Green bearings or the original tapered-roller?
I used tapered roller, because they give more support on turns than Green ball bearings. Also, I had a bad experience in the past with an axle breaking because the green bearing wore out after 28K miles (supposedly they are better quality now)
If tapered roller, did you see the need to replace the retainer plates or anything else?
I had to buy a retainer plate so the shop could press on the new bearing.
 

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What was the labor cost or total cost on that?
Was it a specialty shop? Or just a 'regular' repair shop?
 

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I have cut them off being careful not to nick the axle and I've driven them on with the correct diameter piping. Haven't done one in 20yrs however...
 

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Update:
The 3.55s don't look chewed up or anything, and no noticeable metal in the lube that drained out.
The differential bearing adjusters had massive amounts of punch-hammering marks in most of the holes. ???
1 tooth on the ring gear had a pitted area about the size of a fingernail.
So it's visually not the smoking gun I had anticipated.

The massive amount of free-play rotation when in the car is now very minimal when on the workbench.
Ironically, the known-good 3.23 I am putting in has about the same amount. Hmmm...

The axle/wheel bearings were still nicely-greased, but the driverside had some metal particles come out when I cleaned/flushed it.
So that needs repaired.
I don't think I put enough miles on it for that tight bearing endplay to have destroyed the bearing, but they were used axles, so who knows. Regardless, it's the situation I'm in.

So:
I would like some guidance on replacing the axle bearings, I need to decide whether to buy a cheap Harbor Freight press or have professionals do it.
Anyone with recent experience (like @Ripinator) please chime in!

Did you do yourself or have a repair shop do it?
If yourself, did you use a press or some other method?
If you hired it out, did you give them loose axles, or give them the whole car?
Did you use Green bearings or the original tapered-roller?
If tapered roller, did you see the need to replace the retainer plates or anything else?

EDITED: I had a local shop remove and install the bearings and outer seals on my axles. I supplied the National tapered bearing sets and seals (from RockAuto) and new right-hand studs for the driver side axle. I took the axles to them. The retainer plates were not replaced. I think I paid $200 and change for the service.
 
Last edited:

1970FuryConv

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What was the labor cost or total cost on that?
Was it a specialty shop? Or just a 'regular' repair shop?
$120 cost.
It was a machine shop. The press was HD. He may have had more than one. Shop is no longer in business due to ill health of owner.
 

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I swear. . . Setting up a differential is a black art.

I was working at a driveline shop right out of school in 1990, pretty good shop but the owner was kind of a maniac, and took in lots of ridiculous jobs, rear main seals were my specialty... The owner's two sons got the better jobs, and one day, they took in a big New Yorker or Polara and told the owners that the rear end was noisy - no big deal we can fix it - and I watch this total goober Ed who never spent a day in automotive class pull the pumpkin out, not sure what all new parts in put in it, maybe just bearings, but he didn't really have a clue on setting up. No Prussian Blue.

So he stuffs back in in the boat, fills it up, and takes it for a spin.

Now it's howling. 10 times worse than it ever was when it came in, if it even really had a problem, which I actually doubted. Like a low mileage little old lady old Mopar with a diff going bad?

So he pulls it out, throws in on the bench dripping, he's pissed, it's on the shop now, there's no money in it now, this is all on the shop, plus losing gear oil opening it up.

So he makes an adjustment, stuffs it back in, fill up, test drive, now it's howling different.

He pulls it out, on the bench, really bad temper, back in, even worse now.

About 2pm, I offered to go home and get a perfect 2.76 from my garage floor.

I went home, brought it in, he stuffed it in there, the car was perfect.

By dau's end I hear them tell the customer this story that it so perfect "because they had to rebuilt it three times, only trying to save the customer money by trying to skimp on parts the first two times."

I still get queasy thinking about experiences like that, and how dirty it made me feel to be a part of it. I sold them the pumpkin for $50, and they charged the customer $600 with their song and dance.


I should write a book about a Moparman, what they called me in school, living in Chevy world and all the morons you had to deal with in daily life. How many times I was asked "Why?" Why even drive a Chrysler product much less love one? And that starter...

Eventually, a Chevy got me fired. A Blazer. Came in for a tune up, the boys started playing with it, didn't know wtf they were doing, they put an aluminum intake on it with Edelbrock 4bbl, electric fuel pump, all emission violations, I didn't have any part of that gravy job but did try to give advice like: Put a fuel pressure regulator on it" unheeded of course.

So I come in the next morning, all bright eyed and bushy tailed and everybody looks like their dog died, looking at the crew and Sr., I'm like "why the long faces?" and they say "look outside" and I look through the bay doors and I see the Blazer that I missed coming in. Sitting there completely charred, a blackened hulk, brought back by tow truck after it "burst into flames in traffic with owner barely saving his life jumping out in time".

Ouch.


So then Sr. says we need to fire you, to make the customer feel better. He was after a cop, or ex cop, and you didn't really want to be on his bad side.

Man I was so adrenalined out, I pulled my '74 Dodge Van up to the bay doors, and dumped my whole Snap On rollaway top and bottom - loaded - toppled it into the side door of the van - bed in back shagwagon style van - and left.

Often later, I wanted to send them a thank you card because my next job was for Ryder Truck, 10 times the job, servicing Peterbilts and Kenworths, which is what I wanted to do, fleet service, avoid the public's junk, which is why I'd gotten a 2nd degree in Diesel/Heavy Equipment Repair immediately following the Auto Technology degree.

A couple years later, I went to check out a really nice match grade Garand in the paper and I get to dude's house, fancy part of town, and it's the Blazer guy, Ed S., we recognized each other instantly, and he says "I know they fired you over that, and that it wasn't your fault", and then relayed the experince of sitting at a light, smelling fuel, and jumping out moments before the Blazer turned into a fireball.

I always guessed excessive fuel pressure had something to do with it, because they didn't know how to adapt the fuel line from a Q jet to the Eldebrock properly, they cut it and used rubber line/clamps to make it work, no regulator and I knew they were effing up when they were doing it but couldn't say anything or if I did no one listened.





I once rebuilt a 727 and didn't use it for 6 years


After school I discovered that I really liked to build 727's in my back yard, using a spool to hold tranny up. I bought the clutch pack tools, everything I needed and always went Transgo stage 3, even for street, your neck joint be damned ;]

So I built one for my buddy Bruce, we're still friends and he just got a Fury, '65 I think, but it's going to be a project, anyway it was for his '70 Charger in his backyard at the time, and he didn't put the tranny in for years.

He calls me one day, and he says he got the Charger fired up and the tranny's just pissing ATF out somewhere...

I made a lot of mistakes in life, but not while building 727's, so I know the trans is perfect, no reason for a leak like that, so I drive over there and check it out.

I guess the Charger was a column shift car because he put in a B&M shifter and drilled a through the top of the tailshaft, lol, it was a gusher ;]

No biggie, I switched tailshafts, and we destroyed the evidence.

It takes a really big pair of snap ring pliers to release a bearing maybe, or something back there and I still have those, Snap On, a really giant snap ring pliers made specifically for this job.
 
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