Heavy Metal

amazinblue82

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amazinblue82

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source: Big Tractors: Behemoths on the Farm - Farm Collector

Thw 60's-70's is apparently when the tractor guys tried their best to outdo each other.

Something about the "economics" of using these monster tractors to work farms must have become evident around that time frame?

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source: Top 5 World's Biggest Tractors

No. 1 on this list is "Big Bud" in post #1,721 above, and No. 2 is "Big Roy" in this post above

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amazinblue82

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I forgot we had the "Mack Daddy" of steam "road locomotives" here already. The Case 150. remarkable machine ..

Vintage 1905, ALL 9 ever built were scrapped, and some enterprising fellas in SD got the original plans from Case and spent 2008-2018 rebuilding one from scratch!.

photo immediately below source: Ten Agricultural Inventions that Changed Farming
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Heavy Metal - post #987 nearly year and a half ago.
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amazinblue82

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Like "birds" appear to be the living descendants of "dinosaurs", the modern day relatives of "road locomotives" are "ballast tractors" (source: Ballast tractor - Wikipedia_) .

Lotsa "heavy metal here to follow in subsequent posts.

"A ballast tractor is a specially weighted tractor unit of a heavy hauler combination. It is designed to utilize a drawbar to pull or push heavy or exceptionally large trailer loads which are loaded in a hydraulic modular trailer.

Only a handful of manufacturers produce dedicated ballast tractors. Extra-heavy-duty chassis versions of mass-production tractor units are fitted with drawbar hitches and a separate ballast box as an alternative. These units are classified as N3 Category of Large goods vehicle.

Increasingly, remote-controlled, self-propelled modular transporters (SPMT) are being employed in traditional ballast tractor/trailer roles."



Guess I learned these as "off highway" trucks.

One brand - Hayes, once based in Vancouver BC, Canada - I never heard of till this very day.

Apparently big at one time in the logging vehicles business.

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Hayes was apparently acquired by Paccar back and 1975 and soon disappeared under the "Hayes" name. I presume these "ballast tractors" are still being made by somebody, maybe including Paccar.

Dunno any further about this brand, or this Hayes WHDX 70-170 tractor. I did find an interest group blog post tho. (source: heavy equipment forums, post #2409)

"These were built under the Mack Worldwide name .There was NO HAYES NAME PLATES on them They had MACK on them instead.Anything saying Hayes was removed. They were both LowBed trucks with ballast box's on them. Painted Euclid Green.

Shipped overseas from Port of Vancouver and unloaded in Southern England and transferred to another ship for the rest of the trip to Southern Europe. Both were
Hayes WHDX's Model 70-170


These two had the Cummin's VTA-1710-C-700 engines , Clark CL 16820-9 Trans and the HM-13-A Shift towers Front Axle Clark FDS 22610 and Mack SWSP -643 rear axles 18.73 ratio. 16:00X25 tires."
 

amazinblue82

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More (asserted, but could be others brands too) Hayes-brand logging trucks (source: Hayes Trucks)

Makes sense ... cut big heavy things down "over there", gotta move them over "questionable roads" to "over here". Six wheel drive, powerful, special kinda truck needed for that of course,
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amazinblue82

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Notice how the cab is offset to the left.
sum gun .. looka dat.

why would they do that...

same as this one...front bumper step, "walk path" on LH side, side steps. NOT symmetrical it doesnt appear though.

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Different shot of similar truck head on... same offset. air cleaner/exhaust on RH side, by design OR by happenstance because of "whatever" reason for the offset in the first place (e.g., logging road spec, safety issue, etc.)

anybody know?

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300rag

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sum gun .. looka dat.

why would they do that...

same as this one...front bumper step, "walk path" on LH side, side steps. NOT symmetrical it doesnt appear though.

View attachment 544472
View attachment 544470

Different shot of similar truck head on... same offset. air cleaner/exhaust on RH side, by design OR by happenstance because of "whatever" reason for the offset in the first place (e.g., logging road spec, safety issue, etc.)

anybody know?

View attachment 544476

Mack did that on some of their trucks. I have no idea why.


I suspect it is for the driver to have a better view of the shoulder drop offs on those "rustic" paths they drive on, as well as being able to see around the long hood..
 

amazinblue82

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I suspect it is for the driver to have a better view of the shoulder drop offs on those "rustic" paths they drive on, as well as being able to see around the long hood..

looks like some guys agree with you chief ... Certain Mack's for certain kinds of duty had the "offset" design on purpose - driver visibility in use. They seem to be specifically talking about the "D" models (whatever those are).

source: Viewing a thread - Old D model Mack's why the off set cab?

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amazinblue82

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Learned a new term .. "eight leggers". I have to assume in context this means "eight wheel" drive.

Under each pic what the beast is & approximate vintage. Been around since at least the 1930's.

Lotta remote, heavy-duty industrial/military applications, mainly off-road .. and when you see something LIKE these on the road, they are going really slow.

source: Exotic eight-leggers! | Heritage Machines

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amazinblue82

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Increasingly, remote-controlled, self-propelled modular transporters (SPMT) are being employed in traditional ballast tractor/trailer roles."

The SPMT's (self-propelled modular transporters) .. huge category.

Quick definition of these things: source (Self-propelled modular transporter - Wikipedia)

"Self-propelled modular transporter or sometimes self-propelled modular trailer (SPMT) is a platform heavy hauler with a large array of wheels which is an upgraded version of a hydraulic modular trailer.

SPMTs are used for transporting massive objects such as large bridge sections, oil refining equipment, cranes, motors, spacecraft and other objects that are too big or heavy for trucks.

Ballast tractors can however provide traction and braking for the SPMTs on inclines and descents."


Pictures are worth a thousand words. You'll get it .. MAMMOTH things getting moved all over the world with these SPMT's


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amazinblue82

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Heaviest SPMT load moved to date: 15,000 (U.S.) tons, or 30 million lbs. 60 tons/axle, so 318 axles

These are crane girders made by a South Korean crane company for a shipbuilding company in Singapore. The video shows the Korea-Singapore move in a couple condensed minutes.

Example of an assembled crane at the shipyard - the orange horizontal pieces ("girders' - 182m x 30m x21m) are the things (exact ones maybe?) being moved.

The thing UNDER the crane (suspended from crane and the part in the water) looks like the oil platform built by the Singapore company for an oil company.

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Basically, the Korea-built girders are SPMT moved onto a mega-barge for the ocean trip to Singapore. Then, after the girders and SPMT's all get to Singapore, the girders have to be rotated 90 degrees while ON the barge to be later unloaded FROM the barge

(source: 15,000t! The world’s largest project ever done on self-propelled trailers by Cometto SPMT! - Self-propelled vehicles - Heavy load modules - Cometto)

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