Disc brake conversion kits

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Been looking at various disc brake conversion kits for our 67 and think I have narrowed it down to either Wilwood Pro Series or SSBC (which have lots of different kits).

Does any of you guys have any experience with some of the kits in the links here?

Mopar C-body front brake kit for stock Drum Spindle 65-72

Product Result

received_961886184813711.jpeg
 
I don't know about the Wildwood, but the SSBC has a horrible reputation for quality and customer service... In fact, they were out of business for a while, then back, then I thought they went out again... But I guess not.

I'd look at using early 70's Mopar OEM parts rather than a kit, but that's just me (and a lot of others).
 
Finding and using used factory disc brake parts, competently rebuilt, will provide a much more ROBUST braking system than ANY aftermarket kit. Check other threads in here for what to look for/get.

The ONE plus for Wilwood is their longevity in business. I remember when they first appeared on the drag racing scene with disc brake kits for drag cars. At the time, their components seemed "small" compared to factory OEM parts. That is their heritage. In brakes, "don't want small", to me. BUT we also know that as the cars age, fewer will be around so fewer parts from the auto supply people as sales volumes decrease. One observed issue with the Scarebird/"will fit" kits using OEM parts sourced from auto supply vendors.

There will always be caliper kits and calipers around in the aftermarket, but rotors are a different situation. In one respect, a "kit" which would use the factory hub, but have rotors which slide onto it rather than a brake drum might be a good approach. Then figure out the mounting for a GM single-piston caliper (with D52-style pads) and you're done.

Now, things can get a bit blurry on the issue of power boosters. Chrysler put a dual-diaphram unit with the earlier power disc brake systems. In later years (fuselage), a single diaphram of a larger diameter. Might play that part by ea?

NO real need for disc brakes unless you plan on towing or drive in the mountains. But then again, Chrysler put wider shoes and drums on their two packages from the factory. YET, more heat-tolerant brake linings are available for normal-width brakes.

Just some thoughts and observations,
CBODY67
 
I have now heard from several individuals that SSBC is one to stay away from so that's out of the picture now. There is a third option however which I was made aware of:

C-BODY (1965-1973) FRONT DISC KIT (Standard Rotors)

Any experience or knowledge about this kit?

As for the car it has new drums but it will be used a lot, both daily around town and longer trips (the first trip home from the port is 8+ hours and includes mountains) so my buddy recommended swapping for discs.

If we can find any oem stuff in time we might do that, but we plan to ship it next month so I cannot wait too long for parts.

Appreciate all your wisdom in here
 
I was thinking about this, and wondering what could be done from scratch - what caliper/rotor/bearing setup would you want on the front of a C-body.

The only direct experience I have with disk brakes for the past 25 years have been on my various '00 - '04 300m's. And about the m's, one thing I note is that it comes with 17" rims. In the winter I put 16" steel snow tires on them. On the front. On the back I put 15" rims (with different tire size but same OD as the front). 15" rims don't fit on the front - they don't clear the caliper.

So the rear wheels on the 300m, with their caliper setup, will take 15" rims. Translating that to a C-body, I'm thinking wow, is the dinky little rotor/caliper setup on the rear wheels of a 300m equivalent to what will fit on the front of a C-body, if they have to be stuffed behind a 15" rim?

The front end brake parts for a 300m are ridiculously cheap. For $250 total you can buy the pads, rotors, caliper and wheel bearing for the front. Just need a knuckle to mount them to. No spindle needed.

I do think that not enough is said about the theoretical or actual difference between the brake shoes available today vs 50 years ago and their ability to deal with heat. And that there are different shoe widths available if you have a matching drum.
 
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If you dig out some of the old road tests from back then, a big lot of drum brake cars had 0-60 stopping distances of (generally) about 130'. Some got down to a bit under 120'.CAR AND DRIVER used 0-70mph, which resulted in longer distances. NO ABS, other than the driver's left foot. That was on the very skinny (by modern standards) tires, too. As the rear wheels wanted to lock-up. It would seem that with modern radials, the stopping would be quicker.

Fade performance relates to two things. Air flow around the drum/discs and the friction compound of the linings/pads. Air circulation around the disc brake rotors is one thing which gives disc braies their anti-fade advantage. AND why many USA brands had vented front rotors! Which should also mean that a more open type of wheel should also help brake performance for either type of brakes.

Be advised, too, that getting "slotted and drilled" rotors basically eliminates the possibility of resurfacing the rotors, later on, with a normal lathe-cutter machine. Have to be "ground down" instead, if not outright replaced.

IF you might be over the age of 65 Earth Years or so, you KNEW not to drive fast in the Mountains. To not ride the brakes going downhill, but use "2" position in the TF so engine braking could assist keeping the vehicle speed under control. The physical mass of the brake items themselves can affect fade too, with more physical mass being better than less physical mass for initial head absorption and dissipation.

Even with modern vehicles, it IS still possible for 4-whl disc brakes to have heat issues. My late machine shop operative and his lady friend would regularly go to Bransom, MO for weekend trips. He obviously rode the brakes as they enjoyed drives in the hills. He told me which of the GM cars they rented had toasty brakes when they got back to town. "Toasty" means new pads were needed, possibly rotors too.

Make your best purchase decisions!
CBODY67
 
If you go with the Wilwood kit, get the 12.19" rotors. I don't like the Wilwood much because of the aluminum hub and the thinner than stock rotors. A client did one of the Wilwood kits on his Cuda after a shop talked him into it, It grew to be an awful disappointing experience for him. Thats when he met me and I explained that the new kit was smaller braking surface than what he removed.
The Wilwood master cylinder has a very deep female bore for the pedal rod that requires a spacer you order from Wilwood to take up the slack, the shop that did this install pushed a few small nuts in and still a sloppy pedal. I corrected the sloppy pedal until we installed we installed a Chrysler designed front disc brake system with the 11.75" x 1" Rotors and sliding calipers supplied by Doctor Diff. New master cylinder and push rod and my client was very happy after.
 
I can give you some first-hand live experience....

Bought my 1969 Fury in February of 2023. Previous owner had someone install SSBC rotors, calipers, adapters, and adjustable rear brake valve. Also installed a LEEDS brake booster.

1) Car stops fine in a controlled stop. However, a panic stop...No such luck. The pedal is firm, the car just plain does not stop like I think it should. Does not instill confidence in an uncontrolled situation.
NOTE: I have been working on cars for 40 years. Been an old-car guy most of those years. I am NOT comparing this car to my daily drivers (both
newerand 4 wheel disc <2002 F 150, and 2007 Crown Victoria>). My manual drum brake 1970 Dart stops significantly better than the Fury.

2) Pedal was 1 FOOT off of the floor with an auxilary return spring attached when I got it (shame on previous owners mechanic). Spoke with LEEDS, and they s sent me a shorter adapter rod. Pedal now seven inches off the floor.

3) The pedal also won't return all the way up unless I pull it up with my foot after EVERY brake application. Contacted LEEDS again. They said I need a new brake booster. I purchased their (Chinesium) booster. 200 dollars later, same problem. 200 bucks gone.

4) July 2023. I am in the right place at the right time, and score a complete disc setup off of a 1972 New Yorker. I snag all of it; including the brake pedal
assembly.

5) March 2024...I took the entire front end apart. New bushings, ball joints, etc...I removed the SSBC system, and LEEDS booster. Install all new suspension,
and install the stock 1972 system off of the New Yorker.
NOTE: This includes a rebuilt (booster Dewey) brake booster, rebuilt calipers, and new rotors, bearings and the 1972 metering/proportioning/delay valve.

6) The mass difference alone when comparing the SSBC rotors to the stock Chrysler rotors is significant, in addition to the increased stopping surface area.
Unconfirmed rumor: The calipers and rotors, based on size and mass, were originally designed for a 1st generation Mustang. I cannot confirm nor deny
that rumor. Significant difference in master cylinder too. However, to be fair, I do not know the master cylinder bore sizes.

7) I took the car down the street yesterday. I didn't go far, as I need an alignment. However, the car stops significantly better with the stock
Mopar system from the 1972 New Yorker than the aftermarket system.

In conclusion: I am very glad that I eliminated the aftermarket disc system. Had I not acquired the Mopar disc system, this year, I would have sourced drum brakes and put the car back to drums. I do not recommend these aftermarket systems, though others may differ.
 
I can give you some first-hand live experience....

Bought my 1969 Fury in February of 2023. Previous owner had someone install SSBC rotors, calipers, adapters, and adjustable rear brake valve. Also installed a LEEDS brake booster.

1) Car stops fine in a controlled stop. However, a panic stop...No such luck. The pedal is firm, the car just plain does not stop like I think it should. Does not instill confidence in an uncontrolled situation.
NOTE: I have been working on cars for 40 years. Been an old-car guy most of those years. I am NOT comparing this car to my daily drivers (both
newerand 4 wheel disc <2002 F 150, and 2007 Crown Victoria>). My manual drum brake 1970 Dart stops significantly better than the Fury.

2) Pedal was 1 FOOT off of the floor with an auxilary return spring attached when I got it (shame on previous owners mechanic). Spoke with LEEDS, and they s sent me a shorter adapter rod. Pedal now seven inches off the floor.

3) The pedal also won't return all the way up unless I pull it up with my foot after EVERY brake application. Contacted LEEDS again. They said I need a new brake booster. I purchased their (Chinesium) booster. 200 dollars later, same problem. 200 bucks gone.

4) July 2023. I am in the right place at the right time, and score a complete disc setup off of a 1972 New Yorker. I snag all of it; including the brake pedal
assembly.

5) March 2024...I took the entire front end apart. New bushings, ball joints, etc...I removed the SSBC system, and LEEDS booster. Install all new suspension,
and install the stock 1972 system off of the New Yorker.
NOTE: This includes a rebuilt (booster Dewey) brake booster, rebuilt calipers, and new rotors, bearings and the 1972 metering/proportioning/delay valve.

6) The mass difference alone when comparing the SSBC rotors to the stock Chrysler rotors is significant, in addition to the increased stopping surface area.
Unconfirmed rumor: The calipers and rotors, based on size and mass, were originally designed for a 1st generation Mustang. I cannot confirm nor deny
that rumor. Significant difference in master cylinder too. However, to be fair, I do not know the master cylinder bore sizes.

7) I took the car down the street yesterday. I didn't go far, as I need an alignment. However, the car stops significantly better with the stock
Mopar system from the 1972 New Yorker than the aftermarket system.

In conclusion: I am very glad that I eliminated the aftermarket disc system. Had I not acquired the Mopar disc system, this year, I would have sourced drum brakes and put the car back to drums. I do not recommend these aftermarket systems, though others may differ.

Thanks for the detailed feedback. Might have to see if I can find oem 70-73 brakes.
 
THE RAM MAN did a YouTube video about that kit application for those cars using that kit that he offers.

I don't remember where he said he gets the spindle or the caliper, both hard to come by. I think he said he is having the original spindle reproduced and the pin slider calipers are original Mopar reproductions. He mentioned the caliper brackets also, but I don't remember what he said about them either. I got the impression that the whole thing is Mopar stuff, and he has somehow come up with the hard-to-get parts.
His opinion is that "his" kit using the stock Mopar parts is as good as you're going to do. I don't doubt that.

At $1400, it would make me look around for other options to get the spindles, caliper and brackets used. But, I would not rush to adapt another year Mopar disc system to the subject car since the factory Mopar stuff can be had, for a price. Only as a last resort would I use the other new salad hodge podge kits available. I would rather use the factory drums before I did that.

My experience which doesn't apply here, is that using late 70s Mopar disc systems adapted with all Mopar stuff "from one 78 Cordoba 11.75 donor car" on 60s Mopar drum cars has been very good. So the factory Mopar stuff does work. As in, the cars stop REALLY REALLY good.
Probably don't fit the 67.
 
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I can give you some first-hand live experience....

Bought my 1969 Fury in February of 2023. Previous owner had someone install SSBC rotors, calipers, adapters, and adjustable rear brake valve. Also installed a LEEDS brake booster.

1) Car stops fine in a controlled stop. However, a panic stop...No such luck. The pedal is firm, the car just plain does not stop like I think it should. Does not instill confidence in an uncontrolled situation.
NOTE: I have been working on cars for 40 years. Been an old-car guy most of those years. I am NOT comparing this car to my daily drivers (both
newerand 4 wheel disc <2002 F 150, and 2007 Crown Victoria>). My manual drum brake 1970 Dart stops significantly better than the Fury.

2) Pedal was 1 FOOT off of the floor with an auxilary return spring attached when I got it (shame on previous owners mechanic). Spoke with LEEDS, and they s sent me a shorter adapter rod. Pedal now seven inches off the floor.

3) The pedal also won't return all the way up unless I pull it up with my foot after EVERY brake application. Contacted LEEDS again. They said I need a new brake booster. I purchased their (Chinesium) booster. 200 dollars later, same problem. 200 bucks gone.

4) July 2023. I am in the right place at the right time, and score a complete disc setup off of a 1972 New Yorker. I snag all of it; including the brake pedal
assembly.

5) March 2024...I took the entire front end apart. New bushings, ball joints, etc...I removed the SSBC system, and LEEDS booster. Install all new suspension,
and install the stock 1972 system off of the New Yorker.
NOTE: This includes a rebuilt (booster Dewey) brake booster, rebuilt calipers, and new rotors, bearings and the 1972 metering/proportioning/delay valve.

6) The mass difference alone when comparing the SSBC rotors to the stock Chrysler rotors is significant, in addition to the increased stopping surface area.
Unconfirmed rumor: The calipers and rotors, based on size and mass, were originally designed for a 1st generation Mustang. I cannot confirm nor deny
that rumor. Significant difference in master cylinder too. However, to be fair, I do not know the master cylinder bore sizes.

7) I took the car down the street yesterday. I didn't go far, as I need an alignment. However, the car stops significantly better with the stock
Mopar system from the 1972 New Yorker than the aftermarket system.

In conclusion: I am very glad that I eliminated the aftermarket disc system. Had I not acquired the Mopar disc system, this year, I would have sourced drum brakes and put the car back to drums. I do not recommend these aftermarket systems, though others may differ.
“6) The mass difference alone when comparing the SSBC rotors to the stock Chrysler rotors is significant, in addition to the increased stopping surface area.
Unconfirmed rumor: The calipers and rotors, based on size and mass, were originally designed for a 1st generation Mustang. I cannot confirm nor deny
that rumor. “

I have a 65 Mustang with factory manual discs. Are you referring to the SSBC rotors being based on these or ?

By the way, I have frozen rotors that are perforated with some pretty solid pads. Regardless, I turned them blue at Willow Springs several years ago. They didn’t fade, though. Maybe I was close.

IMG_9942.png
 
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“6) The mass difference alone when comparing the SSBC rotors to the stock Chrysler rotors is significant, in addition to the increased stopping surface area.
Unconfirmed rumor: The calipers and rotors, based on size and mass, were originally designed for a 1st generation Mustang. I cannot confirm nor deny
that rumor. “

I have a 65 Mustang with factory manual discs. Are you referring to the SSBC rotors being based on these or ?

By the way, I have frozen rotors that are perforated with some pretty solid pads. Regardless, I turned them blue at Willow Springs several years ago. They didn’t fade, though. Maybe I was close.

View attachment 652671

And those discs are 11.33 diameter?
That's more than Mopar gave us on a lot of cars bigger than that 65 Mustang.
 
Thanks for the detailed feedback. Might have to see if I can find oem 70-73 brakes.

While you are looking for those 70 - 73 parts, go ahead and bring the current drum brakes up to snuff. You will probably find that the drum setup is really quite robust and is more than adequate for the kind of driving you anticipate. A few years ago, I collected all the disc brake parts from a '72 C-Body getting ready to convert, but the drum brakes worked so well, I have not yet done the swap. BTW, you can get all the required NOS / NORS drum brake parts from @mobileparts.
 
Before you buy anything from the "Ram Man", you want to be sure that the spindles sold are correct. He was trying to market a C body spindle that was adapted from a B or E body and was too short.

We discussed it here: New C-Body Spindles for Disc Brakes. It really starts at Post #30.

Now, if he's selling correct spindles, that's another story...
 
While you are looking for those 70 - 73 parts, go ahead and bring the current drum brakes up to snuff. You will probably find that the drum setup is really quite robust and is more than adequate for the kind of driving you anticipate. A few years ago, I collected all the disc brake parts from a '72 C-Body getting ready to convert, but the drum brakes worked so well, I have not yet done the swap. BTW, you can get all the required NOS / NORS drum brake parts from @mobileparts.

It's not just about discs being better, but also parts availability over here in Norway. I have found 70-73 parts and will get them so we can swap when/if we decide the drums aren't how we'd like them to be.
 
Hello all.
My experience with the SSBC brakes kit isn´t still a good one. The tech service is not so good.
I had the same scenario than Norweianmopar in my 66 Charger. Car stops in normal attent driving, but in a emergency I´m sure didn´t.
I check all the points of possible fail. All apears to be good, hard pedal, no air elsewhere. After using the car, it has been better gradually, but the first day was like no brakes at all.
I have going to the conclusion the pads supplied are not correct for my use because at 60 MPH it stops significantly better than at 20 MPH. Heat better than cold.
I have a Dart with the same brakes but originals, and the passengers can go flying through the windshield if I push the brake hard.
I´m waiting for an old pads of old asbestos material to do the test.

Good Luck.
 
If the pads were semi-metallic, I believe those are not as good until they get some heat in them. But then they don't fade as much as organics would at higher temperatures.
 
If the pads were semi-metallic, I believe those are not as good until they get some heat in them. But then they don't fade as much as organics would at higher temperatures.
Yes, but I don´t know that, because SSBC don´t answer my questions. :(
 
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