1. MJF

    MJF Member

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    I am born in 1980, so I have no personal experience of these cars when these were new. How quiet these were new? How was wind noise from door weatherstrips and vent windows? Or tire noise? Engines are quiet so there is pretty much nothing to hear. (I like the sound of thermoquad :p)
    I'd like to get my -73 TC quiet, but is this even possible :D
     
  2. FURYGT

    FURYGT Senior Member

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    Wind noise cannot be completely eliminated IMHO due to the design of the seals, the design of the cars with more upright windshields, side windows that are not flush, roof gutters and non-aerodynamic windows and so forth.

    Tire noise can be related to the brand of tire. I don't find tire noise to be a problem on any of my C Body's.

    The engines were never far from silent. Overall we are talking apples and oranges with modern day cars and your 73 T & C.

    Tire rack has ratings for tires on noise so if you have the coin to make a switch that may be a place to look. Quieter mufflers will help and replacing the hood insulation pad may help if yours is ratty or gone. Try lubricating the weather strips with a vinyl and rubber restoration product (not Armour All) and if needed start searching for NOS replacement seals for the ones that you know are in poor condition.
     
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  3. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Senior Member

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    Windnoise? Never as quiet in the A-pillar area as most similar GM cars, BUT I made some improvements with black "strip caulk", which I started experimenting with on my '66 Newport, when it was newer. Helped a bit. Otherwise, make sure the door weatherstrip is firm against the body. With age, it can shrink, but it can also be "shimmed" with some thin flat rubber "stock". Do NOT glue it to the door! Most of the issues will be at the base of the A-pillar, noise wise, but that's also a place where the weatherstrip seals pretty well.

    Chrysler UniBody will transmit more road noise into the cabin than a body-on-frame car will. Just the nature of things. I suspect your car already has the factory "Undercoat and Hood Pad" on it, due to it being a T&C wagon. You can get some spray undercoat to add to what's already there on the underbody areas, especially in the wheel well areas. Thicker works better. Maybe even some of that SuperSeal spray they advertise on tv?

    It might be a good idea to pull up the front carpet and padding to see that there are no perforations in those footwell areas. The a/c cases are known to seep over time, keeing the carpet and such under any floor mats, damp for extended periods. Once those possible holes are fixed, then you might add some DynaMat to the floor areas for additional sound/noise control. There are some similar products. I suspect most will have similar results.

    Not sure what you might do with the rear areas. Station wagons never were as quiet as a sedan or hardtop. But make sure that any rattles are found and fixed, plus any squeaks lubed with appropriate lubes. Just going over the car and tightening body bolts and help a bunch in that respect.

    As for windrush, it can be helped but not totally eliminated, by observation, but it will be less than the "slabs" cars.

    PM for additional information.

    CBODY67
     
  4. furious70

    furious70 Active Member

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    My windows don't shut tight against each other, looseness in the mechanism, so seals will never fix that. These cars are way noisier, NVH was not prioritized like it is today
     
  5. cbarge

    cbarge Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    4 door Sedans are the quietest of the bunch. 2 and 4 door hardtops are noisy,convertibles even noisier .
    Wagons have so much square footage they are not so bad and 2nd to being quiet next to the sedans
    3 4dr hardtops in a row and shakes,rattles and whistles.
    the 66 300 seedan is solid and quiet.
     
  6. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Senior Member

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    When TorsionQuiet Ride happened, road noise was much better than the prior cars. Real isolated "front frame sections", plus the iso-clamps on the rear axle spring mounts helped, too, but the handling precision seemed to go down a bit, with more "flex" places to kill noise transmission.

    On my DH43N0D, the rear door glass adjustment made the vertical chrome trim rub against the roof rail weatherstrip. It had worn the rubber such that it was metal to metal. The rh side was not quite that way. The way things were put together, if I adjusted the glass to not touch so much, or the door itself, for better sealing such that a new weatherstrip could be ordered and not "tear up", then the whole rear door would have been out of adjustment. I considered this to be a "normal problem" of the breed. I began looking at other 43 models. On a '71 Plymouth GranSedan, in that wear area, there was a thin, molded piece of flexible plastic, which the metal glass trip touched and rubbed against as the door closed. We could find NO mentioned of it in the parts book. The lh rr door glass on that was adjusted perfectly. So I just put up with that little wind leak on my car.

    Back then, Ford was the King of NVH control. They'd engineered much of the sound transmission places out of their cars, it seemed. GM was next, so long as you were on a hard-surface road, then when you "hit the gravel", the gravel hitting the bare metal floorpan sounded like it was little ball bearings hitting the floorpan.

    Many people criticized Chryslers for "rough ride", but if you put earplugs in and compared the ride motions to other cars on the Interstate, they Chryslers were just as smooth riding, just the road noise and impact harshness of the UniBody made it "feel rough" when it really wasn't. BUT, this also meant that the Chryslers would handle better as the suspension was attached to a stiff body structure, rather than a "flex frame" and "somewhat stiff body" as the Fords and GMs were back then.

    One of the main areas in which modern cars are better is that they are sealed much better than anything prior to them. That helps eliminate wind noise, now termed "wind rush" around the doors and windows. No exterior moldings around the windshields/back glass might have a marginal affect, too, but was driven by competitive factors, which most possibly relate to assembly cost.

    But when I got my '80 Newport, I was impressed with the smoothness and QUIET it had. Then I discovered it had an isolated k-frame in the front frame section, which was also isolated from the body with thick rubber isolators. Then I discovered the 3" thick jute and heat insulation under the thick "high-pile" carpet. Otherwise, it was similar to prior Chryslers. The door glass regulators on those cars had issues, though, as the lh front glass seals poorly (very possibly caused by the "hardtop sedan" styling. The glass hits the bare rubber as a hardtop does, but there's a B-pillar between the doors. Part of Iacocca's prior Ford legacy?

    What's odd is that it appears that the upper door frame from a similar '80s Caprice could be tacked onto the Chrysler door frame, which would then make it a full 4-dr sedan that should be quiet in all respects.

    One thing that you have to understand is that all cars are not designed in a "generic" manner. They aren't all the same, especially in prior times. Chryslers had their own engineering and unique traits/quirks about them. How they felt to drive, how they sounded, body stiffness, etc. Similarly, Fords and GMs had their own corporate family traits. It was not hard to tell them apart, IF you knew what they were and to listen for. And, among the GM brands, EACH one was their own sub-set of the GM family. Lots of differences!

    Ford probably had the best assembly quality, followed by GM and then Chrysler. I will say that the Windor-built Cordobas had higher levels of fit/finish quality than the USA plant Chryslers tended to, from what I remember seeing at the dealership in the middle '70s. Same with Buicks built in Flint, MI. Some plants were just better than others, for whatever reasons. None were really BAD, just variations of Good.

    Enjoy!
    CBODY67
     
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  7. MJF

    MJF Member

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    Thanks for replys!
    I have replaced carpet and I installed a lot of sound deadning under it (similar to dynamat and 10mm dodomat) Also roof has same two layers sound deadning too. Worst tire noise (not that bad) comes from trunk area, I have to figure is it possible to add some deadning there. I live behind gravel road and stones rattles a lot, undercoating in wheel wells probably helps that.
    Absolutely worst is wind noise. It is managable to about 50mph, but above that you would need ear plugs... Drivers door fits like s*it, and vent windows are even worse. I have tried to align door better, but I think whole front end is croocked becouse door does not fit at all. Here we come in second question, how good fenders, doors and vent windows did fit from factory? I had to put about 1/4" spacers between body and drivers door hinges to get door closer to fender. And that messed up door upper frame to body line. So this is one place for huge leak. Another is vent windows. Is there a way to adjust these? There is almost 1/4" gap between gasket and top of glass. Or is the gasket just dried and shrinked that much?
     
  8. LeBaron1973

    LeBaron1973 Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Assembly quality in earlier times wasn't as good as today. I recall that adjustment of the doors often consisted of inserting a block of wood in the door gap and slamming the door closed, instant fix. Maybe placing your car on an alignment rack will indicate the body is out of alignment and it can be straightened?

    All the best with it.
     
  9. cantflip

    cantflip Old Jagoff with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Turn up the radio... a period correct solution to your problem.
     
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  10. Triple Pickle

    Triple Pickle Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    That’s one reason why I prefer sedans..they are a little quieter. Still nowhere near modern vehicle standards though.
     
  11. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Senior Member

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    When my uncle bought a new '62 Impala 6-pass wagon, my father made some comments about them being "noisy and rattle traps". I asked why? He just said they were all that way. As the Impala got some age on it, though well-cared for, it accumulated a few rattles in the rear tailgate area. Road noise didn't seem to matter, back then, but it was a bit louder than our '61 BelAir 4-dr sedan.

    The other thing is that wagons have their many folding seat mechanisms, spare tire and jack and tailgate latch/window mechanisms are ALL inside of the "noise zone". ALL of those usually have some slack in their linkages that make them work, usually. Perhaps a comprehensive activity to ensure all of those things are lubed with good lube (whether white lithium, viscous grease, or otherwise) and all mounting hardware is well-secured might help a bit?

    Almost ALL closed body cars have some sort of noise barrier between the back seat and the trunk area. Some thinner than others, if for no other reason than to keep the innards of the rear seat mechanism being visible when the trunk is open. On some, it's just a piece of jute padding "hung" from pegs on the inside of the rear package tray stamping. Others use something more substantial and more quietening. Can't so that on a wagon.

    In those earlier times, unless there was some application of undercoat material to the inner floorpan areas, to change the harmonic resonances of the particular panels, they could "drum" on certain road surfaces. In modern times, perhaps some spray-on FlexSeal or application of FlexSeal Tape might do the same thing? Just enough to change the harmonic resonant frequency would be all that's needed, not a full coverage, usually.

    Some cars had a section of sprayed-on undercoat material on the inner side of their door skins to do the same thing. If you tap the metal, it has a "thud" sound. If that section of undercoat was not there, it'd be a "tin can" sound instead. The number and depth of body contours on the outer vehicle side can have a part in that sound, too.

    CBODY67
     
  12. The Goose

    The Goose Senior Member

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    Wind noise is part of the deal. Look at any tv or movie pre 1974. They all drive with the windows down. Even in the rain a lot of times. It really doesn’t matter with the radio up and the top down though. One funny thing I can add is my ‘69 remote mirror makes a roaring noise you can hear plain as day. Cover the head of the mirror with your hand and it goes silent. Kinda crazy but just part of the deal I guess.

    Trunk separator card behind the back seat and dynomat stuck inside the doors will help too. Good luck with the project.
     
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  13. Turboomni

    Turboomni Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    My 440 Fury has a Stereo,,,it's dual exhausts. My one speaker AM stock radio can't compete unless it is some woman [high pitched] is bitching about some government official on talk radio,,I turn it off and listen to my big block. I think the wind noise was the radio.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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