Relationship between production date code, sequence number ('67 Polara / Monaco)

MoPar~Man

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I don't want to limit this to just 1967 if this applies to other years.

I want to understand the relationship between production date (which technically I know is scheduled build date) and the sequence number, and additionally whether or not there's a w code on the tag and also if the production plant plays a role here. In looking at 8 fender tags, what I notice are:

- some have w6, some have w8, and some have no w code.
- tags with w6 have sequence numbers 05xxx
- tags with w8 or no w-code have sequence numbers 10xxx or 11xxx

Am I correct that you can't get the factory from the fender tag - that it's only going to be on the VIN plate?

Which factories built Monaco's and Polara's? Windsor and Belvidere IL ? If this is correct, then can it be said that the 05xxx sequence numbers would be Windsor-made, the others being Belvidere made? And that maybe all Windsor-made tags will have a w-code stamp (either 6 or 8) but Belvidere tags will either have w8 or no code?

Regarding the build date for 1967 models, what was the earliest 1966 production date and the latest 1967 production date? For example, I see one tag with a date of 811 (August 11). Was that August 1966 or 67?
 
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August of '66 through July of '67 for the 1967 model year.
 
As the VIN is by definition a unique identifier, the assembly plant needs to be included in the code. Imagine issuing company-wide VINs spanning several assemblies. Quite an accounting hassle!

For that reason the VIN includes a code for the assembly. Messaging on the fender tag, that does not include the VIN, is primarily for the needs of the production process within a specific assembly.

'70s fender tags show that not every assembly followed the same coding practices. In other words, fender tag coding can be assembly-dependent.

But, by virtue of the assembly code having been included in the VIN, there is no need to message fender tag-relevant information by means of the VIN. That's why I hesitate to acknowledge a connection between the w codes and the VIN.

Caveat: This line of thought is not influenced by any practical experience with pre-1969 fender tags.
 
C Body’s were also built in Delaware & Canada. In 1967, C Bodies built in Canada with a 318 got the poly 318 and the US plants got the LA 318.
 
As the VIN is by definition a unique identifier, the assembly plant needs to be included in the code. Imagine issuing company-wide VINs spanning several assemblies.

The serial number on my '67 VIN is a set of numbers that I don't see on the fender tag. In other words, the FT sequence number is not used as part of the VIN serial number. So to me, they didn't need to include a factory code to generate a unique VIN.

If different plants assigned their own ranges of sequence numbers to the FT then if that's not documented somewhere maybe we can start to figure that out.
 
I don't want to limit this to just 1967 if this applies to other years.

I want to understand the relationship between production date (which technically I know is scheduled build date) and the sequence number, and additionally whether or not there's a w code on the tag and also if the production plant plays a role here. In looking at 8 fender tags, what I notice are:

- some have w6, some have w8, and some have no w code.
- tags with w6 have sequence numbers 05xxx
- tags with w8 or no w-code have sequence numbers 10xxx or 11xxx

Am I correct that you can't get the factory from the fender tag - that it's only going to be on the VIN plate?

Which factories built Monaco's and Polara's? Windsor and Belvidere IL ? If this is correct, then can it be said that the 05xxx sequence numbers would be Windsor-made, the others being Belvidere made? And that maybe all Windsor-made tags will have a w-code stamp (either 6 or 8) but Belvidere tags will either have w8 or no code?

Regarding the build date for 1967 models, what was the earliest 1966 production date and the latest 1967 production date? For example, I see one tag with a date of 811 (August 11). Was that August 1966 or 67?

Sorry if this is lengthy but there is a lot to unpack in those questions.

Coding can be similar to different years but for practical purposes, each year is different enough that when discussing coding, one should stay within a specific year.

1967 coding is similar to 1966 but unique in its own way. 1968 is way different than 1967.

So...first rule when comparing tags is stay within the same model year.

Coding can change within a model year at the same plant. What was coded in August may or may not have been coded in May. Be aware of coding changes within the year at the same plant.

For 66 and 67, SO numbers are make dependent. Meaning assigned SO codes for Valiants (A body Plymouths) are different than B body Dodges which are different than C body Plymouths which are different than Chrysler's that are different from Imperials. The topic of SO/VON assignments across the various years is a book unto itself.

For 66 and, presumably 67, it appears as if each plant uses a five digit SO number with the last three digits resetting each day. The first two digits indicate the make and body classification i.e, C body Dodges built at the Belvedere plant start with the number 10001 each day of production meaning you can have a sequence of 801 10001 and the next day have car 802 10001. IF you build more than 999 cars in ay one day, then the first two numbers go from 10 to 11. If my theory is correct, a car with SO number 11202 would be the 1201st C body Dodge built at that plant on that day. I'm still compiling data to verify this theory.

One still finds non normal SO assignments for fleet cars, lease cars, show cars etc. This classification of cars would start with numbers different than the typical assignments. For example, a DK cop car SO may start with 89. A DL27 promo car may start with 22. A typical US sold 67 Dodge SO starts with 10 or 11 whether it's from the Windsor or Belvedere plant.

Each plant had its own coding nuances meaning, yes, you can, sometimes, determine the plant of origin by the specific nuances on the tag. Different plants coded differently. Identifying inspection stamps vary by plant.

As pointed out, 67 Windsor used screws too afix the tag, the Belvedere plant used rivets. '67 Windsor coded w/6 or w/8 to indicate the final country of sale either Canada or the US. Belvedere did not code this. 67 Windsor used a two digit tire code. Belvedere used a three digit code.

So you can look at a 67 full size Dodge and determine at which plant it was built simply by looking at the tag.

The VIN rages are different for Windsor w/6 and w/8 cars.

In my estimation, Windsor used the 05 SO number in conjunction with the w/6 code (built for sale in Canada) and the 10 or 11 SO code for w/8 built for sale in the US cars. Belvedere used SO numbers 10 or 11 for typical full size Dodges. More examples would help with this research.

67_DH23_83_5_KK1_05146-down.jpg
 
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I did not know about 2-digit vs 3-digit tire code difference. Were there that many tire sizes that needed 3 digits? Did all cars always get a spare tire?

I just find it hard to believe (but it was apparently true) that '67 Windsor-made Monaco's for US sale were made with Polara tail lights and Polara grill - the same as for the Canadian-market cars.

And to clarify - for '67, were there just 2 plants making Monaco's and Polara's ? (Windsor and Belvidere ?)
 
I did not know about 2-digit vs 3-digit tire code difference. Were there that many tire sizes that needed 3 digits? Did all cars always get a spare tire?

I just find it hard to believe (but it was apparently true) that '67 Windsor-made Monaco's for US sale were made with Polara tail lights and Polara grill - the same as for the Canadian-market cars.

And to clarify - for '67, were there just 2 plants making Monaco's and Polara's ? (Windsor and Belvidere ?)
See list of tire sizes and codes. (Canadian fleet list,btw)
As others said, each plant may use their own codes.
The (5) confirms each car got 5 tires. In some provinces and or states, a spare tire is required as part of their vehicle inpection/ certification.
So yes each car got a spare tire.
At this time, unless proven wrong, I am assuming they were the only 2 plants.
A and B bodies had plants in other states and in California to meet their demand.
CBeing the " third" of the " Big Three" our full sized Dodges were not built in great numbers compared to full sized Phords and Chebbies.

20231110_005106.jpg
 
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